Scientific Program

Conference Series LLC Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 17th International Conference on Cytopathology and Histopathology Vancouver, Canada.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Ham Benghuzzi

University of Mississippi Medical Center, USA

Keynote: The role of fibrous tissue thickness on the sustained release of biologicals from ceramic delivery systems

Time : 9:30

Cytopathology 2019 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ham Benghuzzi photo
Biography:

Dr. Benghuzzi is a Professor at the University of MS Medical Center. He is known nationally and internationally as a pioneer in Ceramic Drug Delivery Systems. He has over 250 PubMed indexed articles and over 700 abstracts detailing the release characteristics of various biologicals from the bioceramic carriers. He has trained more than 35 PhD students who are actively involved in academic careers.  He has mentored students at all levels (from high school, undergrad, grad, post doc and faculty).  He has served as a mentor for residents and faculty on more than 10 funded grants.  He has been in research leadership roles in many organizations such President of the Academy of Surgical Research, Vice President of the Rocky Mountain Bioengineering Society, President of MAS, Academy’s Executive Director, and also organized and chaired several regional, national and international society programs.  He has also served on numerous NIH special emphasis panels including R-25, K01, KO8, T-35, and the P-60 center grants.  In addition, he has received numerous awards from various organizations during his career.  A few of his awards included: (1) The Presidential Award from the RMBS, (2) Presidential Award from SEM International, (3) the Endocrine’s Society Outstanding Investigator Award, (4) MAS Contribution to Science Award, (5) The MAS Dudley Peeler Award, and (6) HEADWAE Award, (7) C. Hall Award, Outstanding Contribution to Biomedical Engineering (32nd SBEC), and (8) ISCM Excellence Award from the International Society for Ceramics in Medicine.  He was invited as a keynote/plenary to speak at state, national and international levels including recent invitations in France, Italy, Spain, Greece, China, Poland, Dubai and Canada. He is a fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) as well as an International Fellow of Biomaterials Science and Engineering (FBSE).

Abstract:

Keynote Forum

Guoxiong Xu

Fudan University, China

Keynote: Role of pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase in breast cancer

Time : 10:55-11:35

Cytopathology 2019 International Conference Keynote Speaker Guoxiong Xu photo
Biography:

Guoxiong Xu is a Professor of Oncology, Scientist, and Director of Research Center for Clinical Medicine in Jinshan Hospital, Fudan University, China. He obtained MD from the Faculty of Medicine, Shanghai Second Medical University in China, a master’s degree in Medical and Pharmaceutical Research from the Free University of Brussels in Belgium, and a Ph.D. degree from York University in Canada. He has worked as a Clinician and Research Scientist in several reputed universities and institutes. He has published more than 80 papers in peer-reviewed journals and his work has been supported by grants such as the National Natural Science Foundation of China. He has been serving as a member of the Editorial Board in many scientific journals.

 

Abstract:

Breast cancer is the most common malignant tumor and the second leading cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Among all breast cancer cases, invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) is the most common type of breast cancer that accounts for more than 70% of total diagnosed cases. Pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase (PNPO) is a converting enzyme for pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), an active form of vitamin B6, which serves as a co-factor for more than 140 enzymes that participate many metabolic reactions. However, the biological function of PNPO in human breast IDC remains unclear. Furthermore, a regulatory mechanism of PNPO is not fully understood. Recently, we evaluate the biological function and regulatory mechanism of PNPO in human IDC. We found that PNPO was associated with IDC development and was correlated with the overall survival of patients. Loss-of-function assays showed that PNPO affected breast cancer cell proliferation, migration, invasion, colony formation, cell cycle, and apoptosis. Interestingly, we found a microRNA response element in PNPO and lncRNA MALAT1 transcripts for miR-216b-5p. Dual-luciferase reporter assays confirmed the binding of miR-216b-5p to PNPO and MALAT1. Targeting MALAT1 resulted in the alteration of the expression level of miR-216b-5p and PNPO mRNA. The change of miR-216b-5p level affected PNPO expression, indicating that PNPO was regulated by MALAT1 via miR-216b-5p. These results reveal a regulatory mechanism of competing endogenous RNAs in breast cancer.

 

Keynote Forum

Michelle A. Tucci

University of Mississippi Medical Center, USA

Keynote: Development of a rat neuroma model to study hyperalgesia and the histopathological changes associated with pain

Time : 11:35-12:15

Cytopathology 2019 International Conference Keynote Speaker Michelle A. Tucci  photo
Biography:

Painful neuromas are a common and debilitating result of peripheral nerve trauma and a common complication following limb amputation. We sought to evaluate early developing and mature neuromas tissue for specific subtypes of fibers and receptors based on their immuno-reactive profiles. Our overall goal was to identify the location of the NPY producing cells and the density of NPY 1 receptor on the growing neuroma tissue.  Neuropeptide Y is a 36 amino acid peptide that has been implicated in pain and the NPY 1 receptor is believed to contribute to the growth of the neuroma.  The results show by 30 days the presence of a neuroma that increased in size over 60 days.  Within seven days of injury the pain withdrawal threshold declined by 73% while an average decline in the Sham injured animal group declined 33%.  The decline in the Sham group was most likely due to inflammatory pain from the surgical site.  By 30 days the animals in the Sham group showed no differences in pain threshold measurements either between legs or compared to the control Naïve animals.  The CCI animals showed a slight rebound in pain threshold withdrawal to 43% of their baseline score.  Similar finding were seen at the 60 day time point.   Detection of the NPY 1 receptor was seen surrounding the epineurium and the cells positive for NPY were within the fat surrounding the nerve and with the cells of perineum.  Overall, our findings show NPY producing cells in the expanding region of the neuroma.  Future research will be directed at targeting the receptors to disrupt growth and/or development of the neuroma.

 

Abstract:

Painful neuromas are a common and debilitating result of peripheral nerve trauma and a common complication following limb amputation. We sought to evaluate early developing and mature neuromas tissue for specific subtypes of fibers and receptors based on their immuno-reactive profiles. Our overall goal was to identify the location of the NPY producing cells and the density of NPY 1 receptor on the growing neuroma tissue.  Neuropeptide Y is a 36 amino acid peptide that has been implicated in pain and the NPY 1 receptor is believed to contribute to the growth of the neuroma.  The results show by 30 days the presence of a neuroma that increased in size over 60 days.  Within seven days of injury the pain withdrawal threshold declined by 73% while an average decline in the Sham injured animal group declined 33%.  The decline in the Sham group was most likely due to inflammatory pain from the surgical site.  By 30 days the animals in the Sham group showed no differences in pain threshold measurements either between legs or compared to the control Naïve animals.  The CCI animals showed a slight rebound in pain threshold withdrawal to 43% of their baseline score.  Similar finding were seen at the 60 day time point.   Detection of the NPY 1 receptor was seen surrounding the epineurium and the cells positive for NPY were within the fat surrounding the nerve and with the cells of perineum.  Overall, our findings show NPY producing cells in the expanding region of the neuroma.  Future research will be directed at targeting the receptors to disrupt growth and/or development of the neuroma.

 

Cytopathology 2019 International Conference Keynote Speaker Amr Rajab  photo
Biography:

Amr Rajab is a registered member of the Canadian Society for Medical Laboratory Science (CSMLS), the College of Medical Laboratory Technologists of Ontario (CMLTO), and he holds Qualification in Cytometry (QCYM) from the American Society for Clinical Pathology, Board of Registry (ASCP). He conducted several overseas training sessions at Hospitals affiliated and also conducted courses in conjunction with the ICCS/ESCCA Bi-Society in 2015. He is a member of the ICCS Education Committee and also a member of the Hematology Scientific Committee of the Canadian Institute for Quality Management in Health (IQMH). He developed a special interest in hemato/lymphoid malignancies and enjoyed establishing the diagnosis on the submitted blood and bone marrow smears based on morphological assessment and special stains

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Abstract:

We have developed a lymphoproliferative disorder screening tube (LPD-ST) with the aim to provide comprehensive immunophenotyping of lymphocyte subsets with minimal need for additional testing. The LPD-ST consists of CD4/kappa FITC, CD8/lambda PE, CD3/CD14ECD, CD38PC5.5, CD20/CD56PC7, CD10APC, CD19APC-A700, CD5APC-A750, CD57/CD23PB and CD45KO. The LPD-ST was validated against previously used lymphocyte subset panels in Canada (n=60) and in Sweden (n=43) and against the OneFlow LST (n=60). The LPD-ST panel was then implemented in clinical practice using dried monoclonal antibody reagents (Duraclone®) on 649 patient samples in Sweden. In 204 of 649 samples (31%), a monotypic B-cell population was found. Of these cases, a final diagnosis could be rendered in 106 cases (52%), and in the remainder, additional B-cell immunophenotyping was performed. In 20 (3%) samples, an aberrant T-cell population was confirmed by additional testing. Of 425 samples diagnosed as normal/reactive lymphoid tissue, 50 (12%) required additional immunophenotyping, mostly due to an abnormal CD4/CD8 ratio. The LPD-ST tube significantly minimizes the need for additional testing, improves the turn-around time, and reduces the cost of LPD immunophenotyping. It is also suitable for investigating paucicellular samples such as cerebrospinal fluid or fine needle aspirates.